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Midwest Finesse Fishing: April 2021

April 1

Ned and Pat Kehde of Lawrence, Kansas, posted a log on the Finesse News Network about their April 1 outing at one of northeastern Kansas' community reservoirs.

Here is an edited version of their log.

March's windy, damp, and chilly days made fishing in northeastern Kansas a miserable chore for many of that month's 31 days. We had one day when the wind gusts broached 51 mph, and one of the gusts reached 56 mph. What's more, the largemouth bass and smallmouth bass were difficult to find. So, we relished the arrival of April Fools' Day and its mild-mannered wind.

The National Weather Service reported that the wind angled out of the north, northwest, northeast, and east at 3 to 10 mph. It was 28 degrees at 6:53 a.m. and 52 degrees at 4:53 p.m. The thermometers at some locales in northeastern Kansas plummeted to 22 degrees. The sky was fair. The barometric pressure was 30.51 at 12:53 a.m., 30.55 at 5:53 a.m., 30.59 at 12:53 p.m., and 30.49 at 3:53 p.m.

The water level was slightly above its normal level. The surface temperature ranged from 49 to 53 degrees. The water, however, was severely blemished by a terrible red and pink euglena bloom, which decreased the visibility to two to 3 ½ feet, and this bloom has adversely affected the health of this reservoir's once bountiful patches of coontail and other submerged aquatic vegetation. It also looks as if this reservoir's population of zebra mussels has disappeared, which has also adversely affected the water clarity and the health of the submerged aquatic vegetation. (Since the massive floods that raged across northeastern Kansas in 2019, we have noticed that the zebra mussels have virtually disappeared in most of our community, federal, and state reservoirs. During the second decade of the 21st century, we witnessed how the invasion of the zebra mussels paralleled the improvement of the water clarity, the growth of submerged aquatic vegetation, and the bountifulness of the largemouth bass and smallmouth bass populations in a number of our reservoirs. Thus, we are now hoping for a new invasion of zebra mussels. Our reservoirs need them.)

This is what the red and pink euglena bloom looks like at one of its intense spots.

In-Fisherman's solunar table indicated that the best fishing would take place from 2:12 a.m. to 4:12 a.m., 2:42 p.m. to 4:42 p.m., and 8:27 a.m. to 10:27 a.m.

We fished from 12:01 p.m. to 3:10 p.m. And it was a task to catch 21 largemouth bass and one rainbow trout.

In the lower section of this reservoir, we failed to elicit a strike around one main-lake point and a portion of its adjacent shoreline. We also failed to garner a strike around a secondary point and across a shallow-water flat in the back of a large feeder-creek arm in the middle portion of this reservoir; this entire area inside this feeder-creek arm used to be embellished with vast patches of coontail, but it is now completely devoid of coontail and other kinds of submerged aquatic vegetation. Around a main-lake point in the upper portions of this reservoir, we failed to elicit a strike and find any submerged aquatic vegetation.

We did catch one largemouth bass along 75-yard stretch of a main-lake shoreline in the upper portions of this reservoir. This shoreline has a 45- to 80-degree slope. Its underwater terrain consists of gravel, rocks, and boulders. The water's edge is enhanced with some winter-dead patches of American water willows, scores of laydowns, and several overhanging trees. This largemouth bass was caught in about seven feet of water on a 2 ½-inch Z-Man's Junebug ZinkerZ affixed to a chartreuse 1/16-ounce Z-Man's OG Mushroom Jighead with a drag-and-shake presentation.

We caught two largemouth bass along the dam. It has a 45- to 50-degree slope. Its underwater terrain consists of gravel, rocks, and boulders, which are enhanced by a few brush piles and a few meager patches of coontail. These largemouth bass were caught on a shortened four-inch Z-Man's coppertreuse Finesse WormZ affixed to a chartreuse 1/16-ounce Z-Man's OG Mushroom Jighead with a drag-and-shake presentation in about four feet of water.

We caught 18 largemouth bass and one rainbow trout across a massive shallow-water flat in the back of a medium-sized feeder creek in the middle portions of the reservoir. All of them were caught around patches of coontail in four to six feet of water. One largemouth bass was caught on a Z-Man's coppertreuse TRD TicklerZ affixed to a chartreuse 1/16-ounce Z-Man's OG Mushroom Jighead with a very slow swim-glide-and-shake presentation. The others were caught on our Junebug TRD TicklerZ rigs either on the initial drop or a very slow swim-glide-and-shake presentation.

April 2

Steve Reideler of Denton, Texas, posted a log on the Finesse News Network about his April 2 outing.

Here is a slightly edited version of his log.

Bill Kenney of Denton, Texas, and I journeyed to one of several U.S. Army Corps of Engineers' hill-land reservoirs in north-central Texas. We rarely fish at this reservoir during the winter months because the black bass fishing is virtually nonexistent, so this was our first visit to this reservoir in 2021.

According to In-Fisherman's solunar calendar, the prime fishing periods on April 2 would most likely occur from 3:27 a.m. to 5:27 a.m., 9:42 a.m. to 11:42 a.m., and 3:57 p.m. to 5:57 p.m. We fished from 8:30 a.m. to 2:00 p.m.

The morning low temperature of 37 degrees was a bit chilly for this time of year. The afternoon high temperature reached 70 degrees. (The average low temperature for this area on April 2 is 51 degrees and the average high temperature is 73 degrees.) An annoying wind quartered out of the south and southeast at 18 to 25 mph. The barometric pressure measured 30.56 at 8:00 a.m. and dropped slightly to 30.51 by 2:00 p.m. The sky conditions varied from being partly cloudy to mostly cloudy.

The reservoir's water level was slightly above full capacity. The Corps, however, was not releasing any water through the dam. The water was murkier than usual from some recent rains; it exhibited between 12 to 18 inches of clarity. The surface temperature ranged from 56 degrees in the main-lake basin to 60 degrees inside a medium-size feeder-creek arm in the west tributary arm.

We focused our attentions inside three feeder-creek arms and one main-lake bay in the west tributary arm, and one main-lake bay in the south end of the east tributary arm.

This reservoir's underwater terrain consists primarily of red clay, pea gravel, rocks of all shapes and sizes, and quite a number of large boulders. In the north end of the reservoir, there are many acres of thick stands of flooded timber, laydowns, stumps, brush piles, and buck brush. Many power anglers spend their time in that region and consider it a flipping-and-pitching paradise.

We began the outing fishing a feeder-creek arm and a medium-sized main-lake bay on the north side of the west tributary arm. We concentrated on the east shoreline of the feeder-creek arm first, working our way from the mouth of the creek arm to its back end. We caught two largemouth bass in the middle section of this shoreline. The first largemouth was caught from the end of a laydown on a relatively flat portion of a pea-gravel shoreline in three feet of water. The second bass was caught in five feet of water from the end of a relatively flat and rocky secondary point about 30 yards north of where we caught the first bass. Both of them were caught with a steady swimming retrieve with a Z-Man's The Deal Baby Goat that was attached to a blue 3/32-ounce Z-Man's OG Mushroom Jighead. We opted to avoid the white-capped waves and gusty winds, which were pummeling the west shoreline. We did not garner any strikes in the lower or upper ends of this creek arm.

From the first creek arm, we travelled a couple of miles westward and fished a large main-lake bay. This time, we put up with the wind and waves and fished the wind-blown northwest shoreline and a small cove inside this bay. We found significant concentrations of threadfin shad in this area, and we were surprised that we did not cross paths with any largemouth bass or spotted bass. However, we did catch one freshwater drum in five feet of water from this shoreline on The Deal Baby Goat rig and a slow swimming retrieve.

After that, we elected to seek shelter from the robust winds and waves and moved to the south side of the west tributary arm where we fished portions of two feeder-creek arms.

The first feeder-creek arm yielded two largemouth bass. They were caught along the east shoreline and were associated with several patches of large boulders that are situated in three to five feet of water. One largemouth was caught on a chartreuse 1/15-ounce Z-Man's Finesse ShroomZ jig that was sporting a Z-Man's green-pumpkin Baby Goat and employed with a slow swim-glide-and-shake retrieve. The other largemouth preferred The Deal Baby Goat rig and a steady swimming presentation.

From that feeder-creek arm, we meandered over to the second feeder-creek arm, which is located a short distance to the east. This creek arm is divided into a north and a south arm. It also contains a large marina where the two arms divide. We shared this feeder-creek with about a half-dozen boat anglers.

In the north arm of this feeder creek, we fished behind two anglers and caught two largemouth bass. The first one was a handsome specimen that weighed five pounds, two ounces. It was abiding in five feet of water and was relating to a cluster of large boulders that clutter the north shoreline of this creek arm. The other largemouth was caught about 15 yards further down the shoreline. It was also associated with the same cluster of large boulders in five feet of water. Both of these largemouth bass were bewitched by a swimming retrieve with The Deal Baby Goat rig.

The south arm was more productive than the north one; it yielded five largemouth bass.

Two were caught along its south shoreline, which is relatively flat and comprised of mostly pea-gravel mixed with large rocks. Both were associated with a couple of small patches of large rocks in three to five feet of water. They were beguiled by The Deal Baby Goat rigs and a slow swimming retrieve,

One largemouth was caught on a slow swimming retrieve with The Deal Baby Goat rig from the end of an old and dilapidated concrete boat ramp on the west end of the north shoreline. This shoreline is steeper than the south one and has about a 30-degree incline. It is also composed primarily of pea-gravel mixed with large rocks.

The other two largemouth bass were caught in three to seven feet of water from a rocky shoreline on the east side of the creek arm. One was caught on a swimming retrieve with The Deal Baby Goat rig, and the other one was caught on the green-pumpkin Baby Goat rig and a slow swimming retrieve.

We failed to generate any strikes from a couple of prominent secondary points, two minor mud flats adorned with rocks and flooded stickups, and a large pocket on the west end of the north shoreline.

We spent the last 30 minutes of this outing plying portions of a main-lake bay on the south end of the east tributary arm. This bay offered us protection from the white-capped waves and blustery winds, and it yielded one largemouth bass and one spotted bass. Both of these black bass were extracted from three to five feet of water along a riprap section of the bay's south shoreline. The largemouth bass was caught on a swimming presentation with the green-pumpkin Baby Goat rig. The spotted bass was allured by a three-inch Z-Man's pearl Slim SwimZ attached to a blue 3/32-ounce OG Mushroom Jighead.

In conclusion, the black bass fishing in north-central Texas has been slow this spring. But we did manage to eke out 12 largemouth bass, one spotted bass, and one freshwater drum in 5 1/2 hours. Ten of the 13 black bass were decent-sized ones that weighed between 1 1/2 to 2 1/2 pounds. One was a handsome specimen that weighed five-pounds, two ounces. The other two were dinks, but they were fun to catch.

April 3

Bob Gum of Kansas City, Kansas, posted a brief on the Finesse News Network about his outing with Andy and Greg Godwin at one of northeastern Kansas' power-plant reservoirs on April 3.

Here is an edited version of his log.

The nearest National Weather Service station reported that the low temperature was 46 degrees. The high temperature was 73 degrees. The wind angled out of the south and southwest at 7 to 13 mph. The sky was fair. The barometric pressure fluctuated from 30.18 to 30.20 to 30.16 to 30.14.

In-Fisherman's solunar table indicated that the best fishing would take place from 4:22 a.m. to 6:22 a.m., 4:52 p.m. to 6:52 p.m., and 10:37 a.m. to 12:37 p.m.

We fished from about 7:00 a.m. to 2:30 p.m.

The water exhibited about one foot of visibility along the dam, where the surface temperature was 56 degrees. Water was flowing over the spillway.

We spent a portion of the outing fishing along a massive riprap shoreline and a riprap-adorned causeway along the east side of the reservoir. We spent most of the outing along the dam's riprap shoreline, which lies along the south side of the reservoir.

We caught 26 fish: one channel catfish, five freshwater drum, eight white bass, and 12 largemouth bass. Five of the largemouth bass were hefty specimens; the biggest one weighed 6.5 pounds, and the second biggest weighed five pounds.

Most of the largemouth bass were caught in three to eight feet of water, and the bigger specimens were caught in about eight feet of water.

Our most effective Midwest finesse rigs were a 2 ½-inch Z-Man's Junebug ZinkerZ affixed to a red 1/20-ounce mushroom-style jig and a Z-Man's mud-dog TRD MinnowZ affixed to a black 1/16-ounce mushroom-style jig.

When the wind began to angle out of the southwest, we used a drift sock to slow the pace of the boat.

Our most effective presentation consisted of a slow drag with an occasional shake and deadstick routine.

April 5

Ned and Pat Kehde of Lawrence, Kansas, posted a log on the Finesse News Network about their April 5 outing at one of northeastern Kansas' community reservoirs.

Here is an edited version of their log.

The wind angled out of the south and southwest at 6 to 37 mph. It was 57 degrees at 6:53 a.m. and 80 degrees at 2:53 p.m. The sky was fair. The barometric pressure was 29.02 at 12:53 a.m., 29.00 at 5:53 a.m., 28.90 at 11:53 p.m., and 28.81 at 2:53 p.m.

The water level was slightly above its normal level. The surface temperature ranged from 54 to 56 degrees. Our secchi stick indicated that the water exhibited 3 ½ feet of visibility.

In-Fisherman's solunar table indicated that the best fishing would take place from 6:22 a.m. to 8:22 a.m., 6:50 p.m. to 8:50 p.m., and 12:08 a.m. to 2:08 p.m.

We battled the wind with the aid of a drift sock from 12:58 p.m. to 3:03 p.m. and caught one smallmouth bass and 17 largemouth bass.

Around one main-lake point in the upper half of this reservoir, we caught 12 largemouth bass. This point has about a 45-degree slope. The underwater terrain consists of gravel, rocks, and boulders. The water's edge is embellished with winter-dead patches of American water willows. One of the 12 largemouth bass was caught on a Z-Man's The Deal Finesse TRD affixed to a chartreuse 1/16-ounce Z-Man's OG Mushroom Jighead on a drag-shake-and-deadstick presentation in about six feet of water. Two largemouth bass were caught on a 2 ½-inch Z-Man's bama-craw ZinkerZ affixed to a chartreuse 1/16-ounce Z-Man's OG Mushroom Jighead on a drag-shake-and-deadstick presentation in about six feet of water. Nine largemouth bass were caught on a 2 ½-inch Z-Man's green-pumpkin-goby ZinkerZ affixed to a chartreuse 1/16-ounce Z-Man's OG Mushroom Jighead, and two of these nine largemouth bass were caught on the initial drop of the rig in about four feet of water, and seven were caught on a drag-and-shake presentation in five to seven feet of water.

Along about a 100-yard stretch of a main-lake shoreline in the upper half of this reservoir, we caught one smallmouth bass and three largemouth bass. This shore has about a 35- to 45-degree slope. The underwater terrain consists of gravel, rocks, and boulders. The water's edge is graced with an array of overhanging trees, some laydowns, and several winter-dead patches of American water willows. We used our drift sock to tame the 30- to 37-mph gusts of wind. One smallmouth bass was caught on the green-pumpkin-goby ZinkerZ rig with a swim-and-shake presentation in about four feet of water. The three largemouth bass were caught on the Finesse TRD rig; one was caught on a deadstick presentation in about five feet of water; two were caught on a drag-and-shake presentation in about five feet of water.

Along about a 100-yard stretch of a shoreline inside a small feeder-creek arm in the lower half of the reservoir, we caught two largemouth bass. This shore has about a 25- to 35-degree slope. Its underwater terrain consists of gravel, rocks, and boulders. The water's edge is graced with two overhanging trees, three laydowns, and several winter-dead patches of American water willows. One largemouth bass was caught on the initial drop of the green-pumpkin-goby ZinkerZ rig in about four feet of water adjacent to the outside edge of a patch of winter-dead American water willows. The second largemouth bass was caught on the Finesse TRD rig with a drag-shake-and- deadstick presentation in about five feet of water.

We failed to elicit a strike around three main-lake points, along a shoreline inside a large feeder-creek arm in the upper half of the reservoir, along a shoreline inside a small feeder creek in the upper half of the reservoir, and along a shoreline inside a small feeder-creek arm in the lower half of the reservoir.

In conclusion, the redbud trees are blooming. We caught our first smallmouth bass of the year. We saw the first dragonfly of 2021. The wind, which has plagued northeastern Kansas with astonishing regularity in 2021, was extremely bothersome once again.

April 7

Steve Reideler of Denton, Texas, posted a log on the Finesse News Network about his April 7 outing.

Here is a slightly edited version of his log.

The black bass fishing in north-central Texas continues to be difficult this spring. For instance, Rick Allen of Dallas and I fished at an U.S. Army Corps of Engineers' hill-land reservoir where we could only dredge up six largemouth bass in six exasperating hours on April 5.

On April 7, Norman Brown of Lewisville, Texas, and I tried again, but this time we fished at a different Corps' reservoir. But when we arrived at the boat ramp at 11:17 a.m., we discovered that the Corps had closed it, so we ventured to another Corps' reservoir that lies about 18 miles north of this one.

It was sunny and the sky was partly cloudy. A blustery wind quartered out of the west-by-northwest at 18 to 25 mph, and it generated endless ranks of white caps on the open main-lake areas. The barometric pressure measured 29.84 at 11:00 a.m. and 29.78 at 4:00 p.m. The morning low temperature was 67 degrees and the afternoon high temperature was 77 degrees.

The best fishing, according to In-Fisherman's solunar table, would occur from 1:52 a.m. to 3:52 a.m., 8:04 a.m. to 10:04 a.m., and 8:48 p.m. to 10:48 p.m. Norman and I fished from 12:30 p.m. to 4:30 p.m.

Depending on where we were fishing, the water exhibited between 6 to 24 inches of clarity. The surface temperature ranged from 64 to 70 degrees. The water level was at its normal pool.

We stayed in the reservoir's southwest tributary arm. We tried to screen ourselves from the wind by fishing inside two bays on the south side of the tributary arm and one feeder-creek arm on the north side. The underwater terrains inside these bays and the feeder-creek arm are similar. They are composed of red clay, silt, fist-size rocks, gravel, and boulders. They are endowed with secondary points, tertiary points, several floating tractor-tire reefs, a few shallow mudflats, several concrete boat ramps, and numerous covered boat docks.

The fishing was somewhat better than it was on April 5, but it was still a chore for us to locate and catch nine largemouth bass and two spotted bass. We also crossed paths with 26 white bass and three black crappie during these four hours. All of these fish were abiding in less than six feet of water.

Inside the first bay, we caught two largemouth bass. One largemouth was caught from the side of a submerged roadbed that is located in the west end of the bay. It was caught on a swim-glide-and-shake presentation with a Z-Man's green-pumpkin TRD TicklerZ attached to a chartreuse 1/16-ounce mushroom-style jig. Inside a small cove that is adjacent to the submerged roadbed, we caught another largemouth bass from a mud flat on the north side of the cove. It was caught on a blue 3/32-ounce Z-Man's OG Mushroom Jighead that was sporting a Z-Man's The Deal Baby Goat and employed with a slow swimming retrieve. We failed to elicit any strikes along a 75-yard stretch of a riprap shoreline and the area around a small feeder-creek where the riprap ends. These two spots are situated on the west and south ends of the cove.

Next, we moved to the second bay, which is located about a half of a mile east of the first one. We caught one largemouth bass at a wind-blown rocky main-lake point that forms the west-side entry to the bay. It was caught on the green-pumpkin TRD TicklerZ rig and a slow swim-glide-and-shake retrieve. We failed to generate any strikes along a clay-and-gravel shoreline that adjoins the main-lake point.

Two largemouth bass were caught from two steep and rocky shorelines on the east side of this bay. One was caught on a slow swim-glide-and-shake retrieve with a blue 1/16-ounce Z-Man's OG Mushroom Jighead dressed with a Z-Man's green-pumpkin Finesse ShadZ. The second one was caught on the green-pumpkin TRD TicklerZ rig and a slow swim-glide-and-shake presentation.

In the southwest corner of this bay, a small section of pea-gravel shoreline yielded one spotted bass that was tempted by a swim-glide-and-shake retrieve with the green-pumpkin TRD TicklerZ combo. We failed to garner any strikes from a small cove, a minor creek channel, and several secondary points on the east side of the bay. A dilapidated concrete boat ramp and a rock ledge along the south shoreline, and two sections of a clay-and-gravel shoreline on the west side of the bay also failed to yield any black bass or strikes.

After that, we ventured inside the feeder-creek arm on the north side of the tributary. Here, the water was muddy and displayed six to eight inches of visibility. The water temperature ranged from 68 to 70 degrees. This feeder-creek arm yielded three largemouth bass, two spotted bass, 26 white bass, and three black crappie.

Three largemouth bass, two spotted bass, two white bass, and one black crappie were caught from two small coves and two rocky secondary points in the back end of this creek arm. Three largemouth bass, one spotted bass, one black crappie, and the two white bass were caught on a slow swimming retrieve with a Z-Man's black-blue Baby Goat that was rigged on a blue 3/32-ounce Z-Man's OG Mushroom Jighead. The second spotted bass was caught on a swim-glide-and-shake retrieve with a 2 1/2-inch Z-Man's pumpkin-chartreuse ZinkerZ that was rigged on a chartreuse 1/16-ounce mushroom-style jig.

In the back end of a minor cove on the east side of the creek arm, we crossed paths with a school of white bass and black crappie that were foraging on several large pods of small threadfin shad. We caught 24 white bass and two black crappie from this school in about an hour. Twenty-two white bass and one black crappie were caught on a steady swimming retrieve with either a 2 1/2-inch or three-inch Z-Man's pearl Slim SwimZ. These two sizes of Slim SwimZs were matched with either a blue 3/32-ounce OG Mushroom Jighead or a chartreuse 1/16-ounce mushroom-style jig. Two white bass and a black crappie were caught on a swim-glide-and-shake retrieve with the 2 1/2-inch Z-Man's pumpkin-chartreuse ZinkerZ.

We were unable to locate any black bass inside one cove, three rocky secondary points, and several sections of three pea-gravel shorelines along the east side of this creek arm.

April 8

Steve Reideler of Denton, Texas, posted a log on the Finesse News Network about his April 8 outing.

Here is a slightly edited version of his log.

From 8:30 a.m. to 2:30 p.m., Rick Allen of Dallas and I fished at a state reservoir located in a rural area of north-central Texas.

According to In-Fisherman's solunar calendar, the most productive fishing would occur from 2:38 a.m. to 4:38 a.m., 8:49 a.m. to 10:49 a.m., and 9:11 p.m. to 11:11 p.m.

This reservoir's water level was 4.10 feet below its normal pool. The water was murky with about 12 inches of visibility. We were encouraged to discover that the surface temperature ranged from 60 to 67 degrees.

The sky was partly cloudy. The morning low temperature was 46 degrees and the afternoon high temperature soared to 88 degrees. The wind was mild-mannered for the first time in weeks, and a light breeze meandered out of the south at 4 to 8 mph. The barometric pressure dropped from 29.86 at 8:00 a.m. to 29.82 by 2:00 p.m.

We targeted portions of a small bay and a main-lake island situated in the lower end of the reservoir; a riprap jetty, and sections of a large bay on the east side of the reservoir; and a small main-lake cove on the north end of the east shoreline.

This impoundment's geological terrain consists of many rock-laden shorelines and points. The bulk of them are graced with laydowns, submerged boulders, overhanging trees, and flooded buck brush and stickups. We failed to locate any patches of hydrilla or American pondweed which are usually flourishing in some of the shallow-water areas in the reservoir's lower end.

We began our search for largemouth bass, spotted bass, and smallmouth bass on the south and east sides of the south bay along two steep and riprap-covered shorelines. The south shoreline was devoid of any black bass, but the east shoreline relinquished 18 largemouth bass, one spotted, and four black crappie. These black bass were relating to submerged rocks and boulders in three to six feet of water.

We then moved to a cove on the west side of this bay. Inside this cove, we slowly dissected two more steep and rocky shorelines, and a steep clay and gravel shoreline. We caught eight largemouth bass and one spotted bass from the two rocky shorelines. One of these two shorelines is situated on the south side of the cove; the other one, which is adorned with several laydowns and the remnants of some flooded buck brush, is situated on the cove's east side. One spotted bass was caught from the clay and gravel shoreline at the north end of the cove. One largemouth bass was able to free itself by diving into a submerged brush pile and tangling our line in six feet of water. These nine black bass were relating to submerged rocks, boulders, and flooded buck brush in three to six feet of water.

From the south bay, we moved about a half of a mile eastward to a main-lake island. We fished around the entire perimeter of the island. We did not cross paths with any black bass, but we did catch four large white bass. They were abiding in less than five feet of water and were associated with some boulders and flooded buck brush on the north and west side of the island.

A couple of miles north of the main-lake island are two riprap-laden jetties that form the entrance to another large bay. We fished only one of the jetties, and it yielded three largemouth bass. Two of the largemouth bass were caught from the end of a large white warning buoy that was laying on its side about 15 feet from the water's edge and anchored in five feet of water. The other largemouth bass was caught about 25 yards from the first two. This largemouth bass was abiding close to the riprap in five feet of water. We did not garner any other strikes from the end and the other side of the jetty. Instead of searching for a few scattered bass in the adjoining bay, we decided to look for a large aggregation of back bass inside another large bay about a mile north of the two jetties.

This bay is the largest one we fished. It encompasses five coves and several prominent secondary points. Most of the shorelines and the secondary points inside this bay are steep and covered with riprap. There are also many boat docks and a couple of concrete boat ramps. In the back ends of a couple of the coves, portions of the shorelines are graced with some overhanging trees and some flooded buck brush.

We caught four largemouth bass and one spotted bass inside this bay. One largemouth was caught from a steep and rocky shoreline at the mouth of one of the coves in five feet of water. The other three largemouth bass and the one spotted bass were caught from the end and one side of a secondary point in three to five feet of water. Both of these locales are located in the northeast region of this bay. We failed to generate any other strikes around some overhanging trees, some flooded buck brush, a dock, and a concrete boat ramp in the back of three of the coves.

From that bay, we travelled northward a couple of miles and fished inside a minor main-lake cove on the north end of the east shoreline. This cove surrendered only one largemouth bass, and it was caught in three feet of water in the back of the cove and close to a patch of submerged rocks. We fished from the back end to the mouth of this cove, and this one largemouth bass was the only strike we garnered.

After that, we decided to return to the first bay where we started the day. We fished the east shoreline that had yielded 19 black bass and four crappie earlier in the morning. This time, the water temperature had warmed from 60 degrees to 67 degrees. We fished around and behind another boat angler and we caught 11 more largemouth bass and two black crappie. These bass and crappie were relating to the submerged rocks and boulders in three to six feet of water.

This was our most productive black bass endeavor in 2021. All totaled, we relished tussling with 44 largemouth bass, four spotted bass, six black crappie, and four white bass in six hours. We also hooked and lost five other black bass. Forty-seven of the 48 black bass were decent ones and weighed between 1 1/2 to two pounds. Only one of the largemouth bass was a dink.

Thirty-nine of the 48 black bass and five of the six black crappie were allured by a slow swim-glide-and-shake presentation with a four-inch Z-Man's black-neon Finesse WormZ matched to either a red 1/16-ounce Z-Man's OG Mushroom Jighead or a red 1/16-ounce mushroom-style jig. Five largemouth bass and one black crappie were enticed by a slow swim-glide-and-shake presentation with a four-inch Z-Man's green-pumpkin Finesse WormZ attached to a red 1/16-ounce mushroom-style jig. Two largemouth bass were attracted to a swim-glide-and-shake retrieve with a Z-Man's green pumpkin Baby Goat rigged on a chartreuse 3/32-ounce Z-Man's OG Mushroom Jighead. One largemouth bass engulfed a red 1/16-ounce mushroom-style jig that was sporting a Z-Man's green-pumpkin Baby Goat. And one largemouth was coaxed into striking a Z-Man's green-pumpkin TRD TicklerZ that was fastened on a chartreuse 1/16-ounce OG Mushroom Jighead and utilized with a slow swim-glide-and-shake retrieve. Two of the four white bass were caught on a steady swimming retrieve with the Z-Man's green-pumpkin Baby Goat that was attached to a chartreuse 3/32-ounce OG Mushroom Jighead. The other two white bass were caught on a steady swimming retrieve with a three-inch Z-Man's pearl Slim SwimZ affixed on a blue 3/32-ounce OG Mushroom Jighead.

We failed to elicit any strikes with a Z-Man's black-blue Baby Goat rigged on a blue 3/32-ounce Z-Man's OG Mushroom Jighead, and a Z-Man's green-pumpkin Finesse ShadZ on a chartreuse 1/16-ounce OG Mushroom Jighead.

Local meteorologists are forecasting possible thunderstorms with tennis-ball sized hail on April 9, so, we will err on the side of caution and reschedule our April 9 outing for some time during the week of April 12.

April 9

Ned and Pat Kehde of Lawrence, Kansas, posted a log on the Finesse News Network about their April 9 outing at one of northeastern Kansas' state reservoirs.

Here is an edited version of their log.

Mother Nature finally tempered her windy ways. Thus, we did not have to fret about her blowing our hats off of our heads into the water and needing to use a drift sock.

The nearest National Weather Service office reported that the wind was calm for 10 hours. It began to stir around 11:30 a.m., angling out of the northwest, north, and northeast at 7 to 10 mph. The sky fluctuated from being fair to foggy and misty to partly cloudy to mostly cloudy. It was 37 degrees at 6:53 a.m. and 70 degrees at 1:53 p.m. The barometric pressure was 29.60 at 12:53 a.m., 29.62 at 5:53 a.m., 29.72 at 11:53 a.m., and 29.70 at 2:53 p.m.

The water level was a few inches above its normal level. The surface temperature ranged from 57 to 58 degrees. Our secchi stick revealed that the water exhibited five to six feet of visibility. We crossed paths with some burgeoning patches of brittle naiad.

In-Fisherman's solunar calendar indicated that the best fishing would take place from 9:19 a.m. to 11:19 a.m., 9:41 p.m. to 11:41 p.m., and 3:09 a.m. to 5:09 a.m.

We fished from 11:34 a.m. to 2:13 p.m.

In some ways, it was an old-fashion Midwest finesse outing. We caught 53 largemouth bass and accidentally caught two crappie, one walleye, and one warmouth. And every fish was caught on the classic 2 ½-inch Z-Man's green-pumpkin-goby ZinkerZ affixed to a red 1/16-ounce Z-Man's OG Mushroom Jighead. And we caught 25 of the 53 largemouth bass during the first 46 minutes of this outing.

Along about a 600-yard main-lake shoreline, we caught 30 largemouth bass. The slope of the massive shoreline ranges from 25 to 75 degrees. Its water's edge is embellished with untold numbers of winter-dead patches of American water willows, several overhanging trees, a few laydowns, five riprap jetties, and several manmade piles of brush. Its underwater terrain consists of gravel, rocks, and some boulders. Six of the 30 largemouth bass were caught on the initial drop of our ZinkerZ rigs in about five feet of water. The others were caught in five to eight feet of water when we were employing three Midwest finesse retrieves: drag and deadstick, drag and shake, and swim, glide, and shake.

We caught two largemouth bass along about a 150-yard shoreline inside a major feeder-creek arm. This shoreline has a 35- to 50-degree slope. Its water's edge is embellished with many patches of winter-dead American water willows, several overhanging trees, a few laydowns, and several stumps. Its underwater terrain consists of gravel, rocks, and a few boulders. One largemouth bass was caught in about five feet of water on the initial drop of the ZinkerZ rig around a burgeoning patch of brittle naiad and along the outside edge of a patch of winter-dead American water willows. The second largemouth bass was caught on a drag-and-shake presentation in about seven feet of water.

We caught five largemouth bass along about a 50-yard stretch of a main-lake shoreline that is endowed with two tiny riprap jetties. This shoreline has a 30- to 45-degree slope. Its water's edge is embellished with patches of winter-dead American water willows. Its underwater terrain consists of gravel and rocks. Three of the largemouth bass were caught in about five feet of water on the initial drop of the ZinkerZ rig along the outside edge of a patch of American water willows. Two of the largemouth bass were caught on a drag-and-deadstick presentation in five to six feet of water.

Around a main-lake point, we caught four largemouth bass. This shoreline has a 25- to 35-degree slope. Its water's edge is embellished with patches of winter-dead American water willows and a burgeoning patch of brittle naiad. Its underwater terrain consists of gravel, rocks, and a few boulders. Two of the largemouth bass were caught in five to six feet of water on the initial drop of the ZinkerZ rig around the patch of brittle naiad. The third one was caught on a drag-and-deadstick presentation in about five feet of water. The fourth one was caught in about seven feet of water on a drag-and-shake presentation.

Along the dam, we caught 10 largemouth bass. It has a 45-degree slope. Its water's edge is embellished with patches of winter-dead American water willows. Its underwater terrain consists of gravel, rocks, and boulders. Three of the 10 largemouth bass were caught in four to five feet of water on the initial drop of the ZinkerZ rig. The others were caught on either a drag-and-shake presentation or a very slow swim-glide-and-shake presentation in four to seven feet of water.

We caught two largemouth bass at the spillway. This shoreline has a 20- to 25-degree slope. Its water's edge is embellished with patches of winter-dead American water willows. Its underwater terrain consists of gravel and rocks. Both of the largemouth bass were caught on a slow swim-glide-and-shake presentation of the ZinkerZ rig in about five feet of water.

We failed to garner a strike around one flat main-lake point and along short portions of two shorelines inside a feeder-creek.

In conclusion, we fished for two hours and 39 minutes and caught an average of 19 largemouth bass an hour. It was almost an encore of the good old days of Midwest finesse fishing that occurred from 2005 through 2016.

April 9

Terry Claudell of Overland Park, Kansas, posted a brief on the Finesse News Network about his April 9 outing with Keith Trumpp of Paola, Kansas, at a northeastern Kansas' power-plant reservoir. Likewise, Bob Gum of Kansas City, Kansas, posted a brief on the Finesse News Network about his April 9 outing on this power-plant reservoir.

Here is an edited version of Claudell's brief.

The nearest National Weather Service reported that the sky fluctuated from being fair to foggy and misty to partly cloudy to mostly cloudy. It was 40 degrees at 6:53 a.m. and 72 degrees at 2:53 p.m. The wind fluctuated from being calm to blowing out of the southwest, west, north, and northwest at 3 to 12 mph. The barometric pressure was 29.61 at 12:53 a.m., 29.61 at 5:53 a.m., 29.77 at 11:53 a.m., and 29.67 at 4:53 p.m.

The water exhibited slightly more than a foot of visibility along the dam, where the surface temperature ranged from 58 to 62 degrees. Water was flowing over the spillway.

In-Fisherman's solunar calendar indicated that the best fishing would take place from 9:19 a.m. to 11:19 a.m., 9:41 p.m. to 11:41 p.m., and 3:09 a.m. to 5:09 a.m.

We fished from 9:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m. We caught 27 largemouth bass, six white bass, six freshwater drum, and one channel catfish.

We caught them on a 2 ½-inch Z-Man's green-pumpkin-red-glitter ZinkerZ affixed on a red 1/16-ounce jig and a 2 1/2-inch Z-Man's watermelon-red ZinkerZ affixed to a red 1/16-ounce jig.

We caught them along several main-lake shorelines from three to 15 feet from the water's edge.

Here is an edited version of Bob Gum's brief.

I started fishing before sunup and made my last cast at 2:00 p.m.

I spent most of the outing plying the riprap shoreline of the dam and its spillway and a shallow-water flat adjacent to the dam. But I did spend some time probing a submerged roadbed, and I failed to elicit a strike at this locale.

By the time I executed my last cast, my fish counter indicated that I had caught 46 fish, which consisted of 26 largemouth bass, eight white bass, eight freshwater drum, three channel catfish, and one crappie.

These fish were caught on a 2 ½-inch Z-Man's Junebug ZinkerZ affixed to a red 1/20-ounce mushroom-style jig and a Z-Man's California-craw TRD HogZ affixed to a black 1/16-ounce jig.

Along the dam, I positioned the boat from 15 to 20 yards from the water's edge and employed a slow swim-and-glide presentation. Some of the largemouth bass were caught in 10 feet of water.

April 12

Ned Kehde of Lawrence, Kansas, posted a log on the Finesse News Network about his April 12 outing with Rick Hebenstreit of Shawnee, Kansas, at one of northeastern Kansas' community reservoirs. It was the first time that they have fished together since the COVID-19 pandemic erupted in 2020

Here is an edited version of his log.

The nearest National Weather Service office reported that the wind angled out of the north and northwest at 7 to 33 mph. The sky fluctuated from being fair for the first six hours, and then it became partly cloudy and mostly cloudy. It was 46 degrees at 6:53 a.m. and 61 degrees at 1:53 p.m. The barometric pressure was 29.81 at 12:53 a.m., 29.92 at 5:53 a.m., 30.06 at 11:53 a.m., and 30.01 at 2:53 p.m.

The water level was a few inches above its normal level. The surface temperature ranged from 55 to 56 degrees. Our secchi stick revealed that the water exhibited 2 ½ to three feet of visibility. This reservoir is being plagued by a massive euglena bloom, and its once bountiful patches of coontail have waned significantly. What's more, it used to be our bountiful black bass reservoir, but now it has become a very trying and disheartening venue.

In-Fisherman's solunar calendar indicated that the best fishing would take place from 10:48 a.m. to 12:48 p.m., 11:13 p.m. to 1:13 a.m., and 5:02 a.m. to 7:02 a.m.

We fished from 10:15 a.m. to 2:15 p.m. and struggled to catch one smallmouth bass and 19 largemouth bass. But we accidentally caught six rainbow trout, two white bass, one golden trout, one crappie, and one freshwater drum.

The shorelines, secondary points, tertiary points, and shallow-water flats inside a large feeder-creek arm and inside a medium-size feeder-creek arm failed to yield a black bass. Both of these feeder creeks are situated in the middle portions of this reservoir.

Two steep main-lake shorelines and their tertiary points in the upper portions of this reservoir failed to yield a black bass.

We eked out two largemouth bass along a flat main-lake shoreline in the upper half of the reservoir. This shoreline has a 25- to 30-degree slope. It is underwater terrain consists of gravel, rocks, and silt. The water's edge is endowed with occasional patches of winter-dead American water willows and many laydowns. One largemouth bass was caught on a Z-Man's green-pumpkin Finesse TRD affixed to a chartreuse 1/16-ounce mushroom-style jig with a slow swim-glide-and-shake presentation in about five feet of water. The other largemouth bass was caught on the initial drop of a 2 ½-inch Z-Man's Junebug ZinkerZ affixed to a chartreuse 1/16-ounce Z-Man's OG Mushroom Jighead in about four feet of water.

Along another flat main-lake shoreline in the upper half of the reservoir, we caught two largemouth bass. This shoreline has about a 30-degree slope. It is underwater terrain consists of gravel, rocks, and silt. The water's edge is endowed with patches of winter-dead American water willows and a few laydowns. One largemouth bass was caught on a Z-Man's Canada-craw TRD TicklerZ affixed to a red 1/16-ounce mushroom-style jig with a slow swim-glide-and-shake presentation in about 3 ½ feet of water. The other largemouth bass was on a 2 ½-inch Z-Man's green-pumpkin-goby ZinkerZ affixed to a red 1/16-ounce Z-Man's OG Mushroom Jighead with a slow swim-glide-and-shake retrieve in about four feet of water.

We caught five largemouth bass along a shallow and very flat main-lake shoreline in the upper half of the reservoir. This shoreline has a 20- to 25-degree slope. It is underwater terrain consists of gravel, rocks, and silt, which is enhanced with some meager patches of coontail. The water's edge is endowed with patches of winter-dead American water willows and a few laydowns. Two largemouth bass were caught on the Canada-craw TRD TicklerZ rig with a slow swim-glide-and-subtle-shake presentation in four to five feet of water. Three largemouth bass were caught on a 2 ½-inch Z-Man's green-pumpkin-orange ZinkerZ affixed to a blue 1/16-ounce Z-Man's OG Mushroom Jighead with a slow swim-glide-and-shake presentation in four to five feet of water.

Inside a medium-size feeder-creek arm in the upper half of this reservoir, we caught one smallmouth bass and 10 largemouth bass. Two were caught on the green-pumpkin-orange ZinkerZ rig, two were caught on the green-pumpkin-goby ZinkerZ rig, one was caught on the Junebug ZinkerZ rig, and six were caught on the Canada-craw TRD TicklerZ. One largemouth bass was caught around patches of coontail on a massive shallow-water flat in the back of this feeder-creek arm. The other largemouth bass and the smallmouth bass were caught along three of the flat shorelines inside this feeder creek. The underwater terrain of these shorelines consists of gravel, rocks, and boulders, which are enhanced with occasional patches of sorry-looking coontail. The water's edge is littered with an array of laydowns and a few patches of winter-dead American water willows. Nine largemouth bass and one smallmouth bass were caught while we were executing a slow swim-glide-and-shake presentation in four to five feet of water, and most of the strikes were difficult to detect.

From nearly our first casts to our last casts, we became more and more puzzled about what has happened to this once fruitful waterway.

April 12

Steve Reideler of Denton, Texas, posted a log on the Finesse News Network about his April 12 outing.

Here is a slightly edited version of his log.

Norman Brown of Lewisville, Texas, and I could not stomach another lackluster outing at the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers' hill-land reservoirs in north-central Texas. So, Norman and I decided to return to the same state reservoir that Rick Allen of Dallas and I fished on April 8. We were hoping to mirror the success of that April 8 outing.

During our foray on April 12, the sky was overcast during the morning hours and mostly cloudy during the afternoon. The barometric pressure measured 29.77 at 8:00 a.m. and 29.76 at 2:00 p.m. The morning low temperature was 57 degrees, and the afternoon high warmed to 86 degrees. A light breeze quartered out of the south and southeast at 4 to 9 mph.

In-Fisherman's solunar calendar indicated that the most lucrative fishing periods would occur from 5:01 a.m. to 7:01 a.m., 10:47 a.m. to 12:47 p.m., and 11:11 p.m. to 1:11 a.m.

This reservoir's water level had dropped from 4.10 feet below normal pool on April 8 to 4.23 feet below pool on April 12. The surface temperature ranged from 62 to 65 degrees. The water was murky with about 12 inches of visibility.

Norman and I fished from 8:30 a.m. to 2:30 p.m.

We fished inside a fruitful small bay on the south end of the reservoir. This bay surrendered 30 black bass on April 8. We also investigated two feeder-creek arms and a main-lake cove on the west side of the reservoir, and a portion of a large bay on the east side of the impoundment. Except for the south bay, these other four areas were not fished during the April 8 excursion.

As I noted in my April 8 log, this impoundment's shorelines, points, and underwater terrain consist primarily of clay, pea-gravel, rocks, and boulders. They are also adorned with many overhanging trees, laydowns, flooded buck brush, and stickups.

To start, we concentrated our efforts on the steep and rocky areas inside the south bay, and we fished these areas twice. We caught a total mixed bag of 43 largemouth bass and spotted bass, and one large black crappie that were associated with the submerged rocks and boulders in less than six feet of water. The rocky areas that were the most productive possessed 35- to 50-degree gradients. We did not elicit any strikes from any of the flatter shorelines that were comprised of pea-gravel and chunk rock.

After we finished fishing in the south bay, we moved to the west side of the reservoir and investigated two feeder-creek arms and one main-lake cove.

Inside the two feeder-creek arms, which encompass many yards of flat pea-gravel and chunk-rock shorelines that are graced with patches of flooded stickups, we elicited only two strikes. And we were unable to hook those two fish.

The west-side main-lake cove lies about a mile north of the two feeder-creek arms. We focused on the north end of the cove, where the shoreline has a 25- to 35-degree incline and is covered with riprap and large boulders. This shoreline yielded only one largemouth bass. It was caught near a large submerged boulder in four feet of water. The other shorelines in this cove are flat and consist of pea-gravel and rock. We opted to not waste any time fishing those shorelines.

We then traveled to the east side of the reservoir and dissected two rocky secondary points and a medium-size cove on the north end of the bay.

The shorelines and secondary points inside this bay are steep with 30- to 45-degree gradients. They are covered with riprap and large boulders. These shorelines are also cluttered with quite a few boat docks, a couple of concrete boat ramps, overhanging trees, and some flooded buck brush.

We caught three largemouth bass, two spotted bass, two black crappie, and one large green sunfish inside this bay. These five black bass and two crappie were caught in less than five feet of water along three portions of two steep and rocky shorelines inside a cove on the north side of the bay. The green sunfish was caught in less than a foot of water from a rocky secondary point as we were freeing a snagged lure from an opening in the riprap.

Overall, we caught a combination of 45 largemouth bass, four spotted bass, two black crappie, and one green sunfish in six hours. We also hooked and lost four other black bass. Of these 49 black bass, our largemouth bass that weighed five pounds, 11 ounces, and another one weighed four pounds, seven ounces. We also caught several three-pounders and two-pounders. Our five largest bass weighed 20 pounds, six ounces. Forty-three of the largemouth and spotted bass weighed between 1 1/2-pounds and 1 3/4 pounds. One was a dink.

Thirty of these 49 black bass were bewitched by a slow swim-glide-and-shake presentation with a four-inch Z-Man's black-neon Finesse WormZ fastened on a red 1/16-ounce Z-Man's OG Mushroom Jighead. Twelve were induced by a slow swim-glide-and-shake presentation with a 2 1/2-inch Z-Man's green-pumpkin-red ZinkerZ that was attached to a red 1/16-ounce OG Mushroom Jighead. Three largemouth bass were fooled by a slow swim-glide-and-shake retrieve with a 2 1/2-inch Z-Man's pumpkin-chartreuse ZinkerZ rigged on a chartreuse 1/16-ounce mushroom-style jig. Another three largemouth bass were allured by a red 1/16-ounce OG Mushroom Jighead that was dressed with a four-inch Z-Man's coppertreuse Finesse WormZ and employed with a slow swim-glide-and-shake presentation. And one largemouth was caught on a Z-Man's green-pumpkin TRD TicklerZ rigged on a chartreuse 1/16-ounce mushroom-style jig and a slow swim-glide-and-shake retrieve.

April 13 and 14

Ned and Pat Kehde of Lawrence, Kansas, tried to compose a log for the Finesse News Network about their April 13 outing at one of northeastern Kansas' community reservoirs. But the fishing was so lackluster that they opted to post a brief description instead.

The nearest National Weather Service office reported that the wind angled out of the north and northwest at 6 to 24 mph. The sky was fair. It was 37 degrees at 6:53 a.m. and 61 degrees at 3:53 p.m. The barometric pressure was 30.15 at 12:53 a.m., 30.21 at 5:53 a.m., 30.27 at 11:53 a.m., and 30.18 at 3:53 p.m.

The water level was about five inches above its normal level. The surface temperature was 58 degrees. Our secchi stick indicated that the water exhibited about two feet of visibility.

In-Fisherman's solunar calendar noted that the best fishing would take place from 11:37 a.m. to 1:37 p.m., 11:58 p.m. to 1:58 a.m., and 5:48 a.m. to 7:48 a.m.

We fished from 12:15 p.m. to 2:15 p.m.

We rarely fish this community reservoir, but the black bass fishing has been so trying at our usual haunts that we ventured to this one in hopes that it would surprise us by allowing us to catch and release at least an hourly average of 10 largemouth bass an hour. But it disappointed us; we struggled to catch eight largemouth bass and accidentally catch eight white bass and one crappie.

We failed to establish a location and presentation pattern. And these 17 fish were caught on three Midwest finesse rigs: a 2 ½-inch Z-Man's pearl ZinkerZ affixed to a chartreuse 1/16-ounce Z-Man's OG Mushroom Jighead, a three-inch Z-Man's pearl Slim SwimZ affixed to a chartreuse 1/16-ounce Z-Man's OG Mushroom Jighead, and a Z-Man's coppertreuse Finesse TRD affixed to a blue 1/16-ounce Z-Man's OG Mushroom Jighead. Some were caught on the initial drop of those rigs; some were caught when we were swimming them; some were caught when we were employing the swim-glide-and-shake presentation in one to about six feet of water. Some were caught inside a small feeder-creek arm, and some were caught along wind-blown main-lake shorelines. One was caught on a steep main-lake point. And along several locales, we failed to catch a fish.

On April 14, Patty elected not to venture to one of our community reservoirs, which used to be graced with a variety of submerged aquatic vegetation and a very bountiful largemouth bass population. But it has become what we call our has-been reservoir.

The nearest National Weather Service office reported that the wind angled out of the north and northwest at 6 to 24 mph. The sky was fair. It was 38 degrees at 6:53 a.m. and 60 degrees at 3:53 p.m. The barometric pressure was 30.21 at 12:53 a.m., 30.25 at 5:53 a.m., 30.28 at 11:53 a.m., and 30.20 at 3:53 p.m.

The water level was about 12 inches above its normal level. The surface temperature ranged from 57 to 60 degrees. Our secchi stick showed that the water exhibited about two to 3 ½ feet of visibility. We crossed paths with a few patches of submerged aquatic vegetation.

In-Fisherman's solunar calendar noted that the best fishing would take place from 12:23 a.m. to 2:23 a.m., 12:45 p.m. to 2:45 p.m., and 6:34 a.m. to 8:34 a.m.

I fished from 11:40 a.m. to 3:21 p.m. and spent those three hours and 41 minutes fishing portions of six shorelines inside three feeder-creek arms.

I caught 38 largemouth bass and accidentally caught 13 crappie and one bluegill. All but one of these 52 fish were caught on a 2 ½-inch Z-Man's green-pumpkin-goby ZinkerZ affixed to a red 1/16-ounce Z-Man's OG Mushroom Jighead. A 2 ½-inch Z-Man's pearl ZinkerZ affixed to a chartreuse 1/16-ounce Z-Man's OG Mushroom Jighead caught one largemouth bass. Some of these fish were caught on the initial drop, but most were caught on either a swimming or a swim-glide-and-shake presentation in two to about five feet of water. I elicited 19 strikes that I failed to hook, and because of the nature of those strikes, I am guessing that the majority of those strikes were crappie.

Twelve largemouth bass were caught along about a 600-yard stretch of a shoreline inside a major feeder-creek arm. This shoreline possesses a 25- to 70-degree slope. Its underwater terrain consists of gravel, rocks, boulders and silt. The water's edge is littered with occasional patches of winter-dead American water willows, some laydowns, several piles of brush, a few stumps, 14 docks, and a partially sunken sailboat. The steeper sections of this shoreline failed to yield a largemouth bass.

Along one 100-yard section and about a 75-yard section of another long shoreline inside this feeder-creek arm, I caught two largemouth bass. This shoreline has a 25- to 45-degree slope. The underwater terrains of these two sections consist of gravel, rocks, boulders and silt. Their water's edges are littered with several patches of winter-dead American water willows, a few laydowns, some piles of brush, and eight docks. The largemouth bass were caught along the outside edges of patches of American water willows.

Eight largemouth bass were caught along about a 500-yard stretch of a shoreline inside another major feeder-creek arm. This shoreline possesses a 25- to 60-degree slope. Its underwater terrain consists of gravel, rocks, boulders and silt. The water's edge is endowed with patches of winter-dead American water willows, some cattails, several laydowns, and a few piles of brush. The steeper section of this shoreline failed to yield a largemouth bass, and a shallow-water flat about the size of a football field yielded three of the eight largemouth bass. The other five were caught around laydowns and patches of winter-dead American water willows.

Along about a 250-yard section of another shoreline inside this second feeder-creek arm, I caught six largemouth bass. This shoreline possesses a 25- to 45-degree slope. Its underwater terrain consists of gravel, rocks, boulders, and silt. The water's edge is adorned with patches of winter-dead American water willows, laydowns, a beaver hut, a dozen stumps, and piles of brush. Five of these largemouth bass were caught around patches of American water willows, and one largemouth bass was caught around a laydown.

Inside a secondary feeder-creek arm, I quickly fished portions of two shorelines. The sections of the shorelines that I fished have a 20- to 45-degree slope. Their underwater terrains consist of gravel, rocks, and boulders. The water's edges are graced with patches of winter-dead American water willows, a few laydowns, some stumps, piles of brush, and one dock. Eight largemouth bass were caught along a 100-yard stretch of one of the shorelines, and they were caught around patches of American water willows that were embellished by some stumps and some small piles of brush. Two largemouth bass were caught along about a 70-yard stretch of the other shoreline, and one was caught around a pile of rocks and boulders, and the other one was caught adjacent to a meager patch of American water willows and a small pile of brush.

In short, I was surprised to catch an average of 10 largemouth bass an hour from this has-been reservoir.

April 15

Ned Kehde of Lawrence, Kansas, posted a log on the Finesse News Network about his April 15 outing at one of northeastern Kansas' state reservoirs.

Here is an unedited version of his log.

The National Weather Service reported that the wind angled out of the east, north, northeast, and northwest at 6 to 8 mph, and there was a 25-mph gust registered at 1:52 p.m. The sky was fair. It was 34 degrees at 6:52 a.m. and 61 degrees at 3:52 p.m. The barometric pressure was 30.23 at 12:52 a.m., 30.22 at 5:52 a.m., 30.20 at 11:52 a.m., and 30.10 at 2:52 p.m.

The water level was a few inches above its normal level. The surface temperature was 58 degrees. The secchi stick indicated that the water exhibited about 5 1/2 feet of visibility. Several insect hatches erupted around 2:00 p.m.

In-Fisherman's solunar calendar noted that the best fishing would take place from 1:12 a.m. to 3:12 p.m., 1:35 p.m. to 3:35 p.m., and 7:23 a.m. to 9:23 a.m.

I fished from 1:3o p.m. to 3:00 p.m. and caught 20 largemouth bass and two crappie. All of these fish were caught on a 2 ½-inch Z-Man's green-pumpkin-goby ZinkerZ affixed to a red 1/16-ounce Z-Man's OG Mushroom Jighead. Four were caught on the initial drop of this rig, and the other 16 were caught on a swim-glide-and-shake presentation in about four to seven feet of water.

Two of the 20 were caught around a main-lake point at the mouth of a tiny feeder-creek arm, and five of the 20 were caught inside this tiny feeder-creek arm. The underwater terrain of the point and feeder-creek consist of gravel, rocks, and silt. The shorelines around this point and inside this feeder-creek arm have a 20- to 45-degree slope. There are some burgeoning patches of submerged aquatic vegetation gracing small portions of the underwater terrain. The water's edges are adorned with patches of winter-dead American water willows and a number of laydowns. All seven of the largemouth bass were caught many feet from the outside edges of the American water willows in about six feet of water, and I suspect that they were abiding around the burgeoning patches of submerged aquatic vegetation.

I spent the rest of this short outing fishing about 70 percent of the shoreline along the dam. It yielded 13 largemouth bass. The dam has about a 55-degree slope. Its underwater terrain consists of gravel, rocks, and boulders, and some of this terrain is beginning to be embellished with sprouts of submerged vegetation. The water's edge is endowed with three patches of winter-dead American water willows and a few logs and pieces of brush. These 13 largemouth bass were caught from about six to 15 from the water's edge.

Considering the sorry state of the black bass fishing in northeastern Kansas during the past two years, this was a relatively bountiful 90 minutes of Midwest finesse fishing.

April 15

Steve Reideler of Denton, Texas, posted a log on the Finesse News Network about his April 15 outing.

Here is a slightly edited version of his log.

From 11:20 a.m. to 3:20 p.m., Norman Brown of Lewisville and I fished at a popular and heavily fished U.S. Army Corps of Engineers' hill-land reservoir that lies in a suburban area north of Dallas.

The overcast sky made the day seem dreary for spring, and it rained on us during the afternoon. (Local meteorologists had forecast rain for later in the evening.) The wind quartered out of the east and northeast at 10-15 mph. The morning low temperature was 54 degrees, and area thermometers struggled to reach 61 degrees by mid-afternoon. The barometric pressure dropped from 30.09 at 11:00 a.m. to 29.98 by 3:00 p.m.

In-Fisherman's solunar calendar noted that the best fishing would occur from 1:19 a.m. to 3:19 a.m., 7:31 a.m. to 9:31 a.m., and 1:42 p.m. to 3:42 p.m.

We spent four hours inside two major feeder-creek arms in the southern region of the reservoir, and a main-lake shoreline underneath a freeway overpass while it was raining.

Inside these two feeder-creek arms, we plied portions of four small coves, eleven secondary points, two main-lake points, five clay-and-gravel flats, and five steep and rocky shorelines.

The underwater terrains inside these two feeder-creek arms are similar. They consist primarily of red clay, gravel, basketball-size rocks, and submerged boulders as large as a coffee table.

The reservoir's water level was at full capacity. The water clarity was 14 inches. The surface temperature was 64.8 degrees.

The first feeder-creek arm surrendered 10 spotted bass and five largemouth bass. The bulk of them were caught along two steep and rocky shorelines in the lower section of the creek arm in four to six feet of water. One largemouth bass was caught in three feet of water from a small mud flat inside one of the small coves located in the northeast end of the creek arm. Another spotted bass was caught in five feet of water around a steep and rocky portion of another small cove on the east side of the creek arm.

We failed to generate any strikes inside the other three coves in the back end of the creek arm, along another rocky shoreline on the east side of the feeder creek, and around a main-lake point at the entrance to this creek arm. And as we were preparing to move to the second feeder-creek arm, it began to rain.

The second feeder-creek arm is situated about half of a mile west of the first one. We concentrated our efforts on the main-lake point and its adjacent east-side shoreline just inside the mouth of the creek arm, a clay-and-gravel flat, and a rocky secondary point in the lower end of the creek arm.

The main-lake point and its adjoining rocky shoreline were fruitless. We hooked and lost one largemouth bass that was abiding in five feet of water on the clay-and-gravel flat. Then we caught another largemouth bass in five feet of water near a cluster of large rocks on the end of a rocky secondary point just north of the flat where we lost the other largemouth bass. After we released this largemouth bass, the intensity of the rain increased, which provoked us to seek shelter underneath a nearby freeway overpass. While we waited for the rain to subside, we dissected a portion of a long and relatively flat section of a pea-gravel shoreline and a series of concrete support columns underneath the overpass. Along the flat shoreline, we caught one largemouth bass and one spotted bass in three to five feet of water. Around the concrete support columns in five to 11 feet of water, we caught three channel catfish and two black crappie.

At 3:20 p.m., we stopped fishing and checked the weather on Norman's cell phone. The weather app showed more rain storms heading our way, so we decided to end this outing earlier than we had planned, and we made the wet run back to the boat ramp before the heavier rain storms arrived.

By the time this April 15 outing came to an end, Norman and I had caught 19 black bass, which consisted of 11 spotted bass and eight largemouth bass, three channel catfish, and two black crappie in four hours.

Nine of the 19 black bass were allured by a swim-glide-and-shake presentation with a Z-Man's Junebug Finesse ShadZ rigged on a chartreuse 1/16-ounce Z-Man's OG Mushroom Jighead. Seven were enticed by a swim-glide-and-shake retrieve with a Z-Man's green-pumpkin Finesse TRD attached to a red 1/16-ounce OG Mushroom Jighead. Two engulfed a 2 1/2-inch pumpkin-chartreuse ZinkerZ fastened on a 1/16-ounce chartreuse mushroom-style jig as it was manipulated in a swim-glide-and-shake manner. One spotted bass was caught on a swim-glide-and-shake presentation with a 3 1/2-inch Z-Man's coppertreuse Trick ShotZ matched with a chartreuse 1/16-ounce OG Mushroom Jighead.

We failed to garner any strikes with a 2 1/2-inch Z-Man's space-guppy Slim SwimZ on a chartreuse 3/32-ounce OG Mushroom Jighead and a Z-Man's black-blue Baby Goat attached to a blue 3/32-ounce OG Mushroom Jighead.

In conclusion, the fishing during this outing was much better than it was at another Corps' reservoir that I fished with Rick Allen of Dallas on April 13. During that wretched outing, Rick and I could barely eke out one largemouth bass and one dinky white bass in six hours.

April 16

Ned Kehde of Lawrence, Kansas, posted a log on the Finesse News Network about his April 16 outing at one of northeastern Kansas' community reservoirs with his grandson Logan Cayton of Las Vegas, Nevada.

Here is an unedited version of his log.

The wind angled out of the east, north, northeast, and northwest at 5 to 12 mph. It began raining lightly around 10:00 a.m. and continued into the afternoon hours. It was 50 degrees at 9:52 a.m. and dropped to 46 degrees at 3:52 p.m. The barometric pressure was 30.23 at 12:52 a.m., 30.22 at 5:52 a.m., 30.20 at 11:52 a.m., and 30.10 at 2:52 p.m.

The water level was a few inches above its normal level. The surface temperature was 58 degrees. Our secchi stick indicated that the water exhibited about three feet of visibility. To our delight, we found a few patches of submerged aquatic vegetation, which had disappeared in 2019 and 2020.

In-Fisherman's solunar calendar noted that the best fishing would take place from 2:03 a.m. to 4:03 a.m., 2:27 p.m. to 4:27 p.m., and 8:15 a.m. to 10: 15 a.m.

We fished in the cool-to-cold rain from 11:30 a.m. until we caught largemouth bass number 50, and that occurred around 2:00 p.m. We inadvertently caught two crappie.

One largemouth bass was caught on a 2 ½-inch Z-Man's Junebug ZinkerZ affixed to a chartreuse 1/16-ounce Z-Man's OG Mushroom Jighead. Three largemouth bass were caught on a 2 ½-inch Z-Man's coppertreuse ZinkerZ affixed to a chartreuse 1/16-ounce Z-Man's OG Mushroom Jighead. A dozen largemouth bass were caught on a Z-Man's coppertreuse TRD TicklerZ affixed to a red 1/16-ounce Z-Man's OG Mushroom Jighead. A 2 1/2-inch Z-Man's green-pumpkin-goby ZinkerZ affixed to a chartreuse 1/16-ounce Z-Man's OG Mushroom Jighead caught 34 largemouth bass.

Some were caught on the initial drop of our rigs. Some were caught on either drag-and-shake presentation or a drag-and-deadstick presentation. Most were caught on a slow swim-glide-and-shake retrieve, and when we failed to hook a strike, we immediately employed a deadstick presentation, which occasionally provoked another strike that we hooked.

We caught these 50 largemouth bass in four to about seven feet of water. Some were within three feet of the outside edge of the patches of winter-dead American water willows, which were laden with gobs of filamentous algae. A few were abiding under overhanging trees. Others were caught from five to almost 20 feet from the water's edge, and we suspected that some of these largemouth bass were abiding around the burgeoning patches of submerged aquatic vegetation.

Forty-one largemouth bass were caught along two shorelines inside a major feeder-creek arm, and all of them were caught in the back half of this feeder-creek arm. These two shorelines possess about a 20- to 55-degree slope. Their underwater terrains consist of gravel, rocks, boulders, and silt. The water's edges are endowed with patches of winter-dead American water willows, some cattails, several laydowns, a few stumps, some overhanging trees, a few shallow-water piles of brush, one dock, and a concrete boat ramp.

Nine largemouth bass were caught along two short segments of a shoreline inside a primary feeder-creek arm. These two segments have about a 20- to 40-degree slope. Their underwater terrains consist of gravel, rocks, and some boulders. The water's edge is embellished with some winter-dead patches of American water willows, some laydowns, several overhanging trees, four docks, some stumps, and occasional shallow-water piles of brush.

Even though Mother Nature's rainy and unseasonably cool weather was uncomfortable, it was delightful to catch and release 50 largemouth bass in 2 ½ hours.

April 18

David Harrison of Lawrence, Kansas, posted a log on the Finesse News Network about his April 18 outing at one of northeastern Kansas' state reservoirs with his father, Ron Harrison of Manhattan, Kansas.

Here is an edited version of his log.

My car dashboard reported that the air was 62 degrees at 3:15 p.m. and 45 degrees at 8:15 p.m. The sky was partly cloudy. The wind angled out the northwest, at 3 to 15 mph. The barometric pressure was 29.83, and it was steady.

In-Fisherman's solunar calendar noted that the best fishing would take place from 3:56 a.m. to 5:56 a.m., 4:22 p.m. to 6:22 p.m., and 10.09 a.m. to 12:09 p.m.

The water level looked to be at normal levels. The water clarity was about two feet. The surface temperature was 56 degrees.

We were afloat from 3:30 a.m. to 8:15 p.m. We caught 93 largemouth bass, eight crappie, three sauger and two walleye.

We caught them on four Midwest finesse rigs: a Z-Man's Canada-craw HogZ affixed to a 1/16-ounce firetiger mushroom-style jig; a four-inch Z-Man's black-blue-flake Finesse WormZ affixed to a 1/16-ounce pink jig; a Z-Man's molting-craw HogZ affixed to a 1/16-ounce chartreuse mushroom-style jig; and a 2 ½-inch Z-Man's PB&J ZinkerZ affixed to a 1/16-ounce firetiger mushroom-style jig. The fish did not exhibit a preference.

We fished along four main-lake shorelines that are lined with gravel, rocks, and boulders. The depth of the water under the boat ranged from four to seven feet. Our Garmin LiveScope revealed patches of submerged aquatic vegetation, but we did not focus on fishing these patches, and we rarely caught a fish around these patches.

The first hour was spent on a windblown shoreline and its jetties. And we caught 24 largemouth bass and one walleye.

After we completed fishing that windblown shoreline, we fished along a wind-sheltered shoreline and some jetties, where we caught six largemouth bass.

Along a slightly less windblown shoreline, we caught 15 largemouth bass.

Then along the fourth main-lake shoreline and some jetties, we caught 15 largemouth bass and one sauger.

Along these, our most effective retrieve was a hop and drag. We rarely caught a fish on the initial drop of our rigs. The largemouth bass were caught three to eight feet from the water's edge. Along the jetties, a deadstick presentation was the most effective one, and in some cases, we lowered the Power Pole, and we "double deadsticked" our rigs in these areas for a few minutes.

The final hour of the outing was spent along the dam. It yielded 30 largemouth bass, eight crappie, two sauger, one walleye, and 8 crappies. The crappie were evident on the Garmin Livescope, and the first one was caught on a deadstick retrieve near the corner of the dam. Five of the largemouth bass were caught casting to the water's edge and retrieving our jigs towards deeper water, and they were caught in six to 10 feet of water. After catching those five, we began employing a vertical presentation as the boat drifted along the dam, and this tactic accounted for 25 largemouth bass.

During the first 240 minutes of this outing, we caught 77 largemouth bass, five crappie, three sauger, and two walleye. Seventeen minutes later, we completed the 100 fish tally, and our vehicle and trailer were the last ones in the parking lot.

April 19

Ned Kehde of Lawrence, Kansas, posted a log on the Finesse News Network about his April 19 outing at one of northeastern Kansas' community reservoirs with his grandson Logan Cayton of Las Vegas, Nevada. For about an hour, they were joined by Logan's grandmother Pat Kehde of Lawrence, Kansas.

Here is an unedited version of his log.

According to the National Weather Service, the wind angled out of the northeast, northwest and north at 5 to 29 mph. The sky was fair. It was 33 degrees at 3:52 a.m. and 55 degrees at 3:52 p.m. The barometric pressure was 29.98 at 12:52 a.m., 29.95 at 5:52 a.m., 30.03 at 11:52 a.m., and 30.03 at 3:52 p.m. About two inches of snow fell during the nighttime hours of April 19-20.

The water level was about six inches above its normal level. The surface temperature ranged from 57 to 58 degrees. Our secchi stick indicated that the water exhibited from one to three feet of visibility. We crossed paths with several patches of submerged aquatic vegetation.

In-Fisherman's solunar calendar noted that the best fishing would take place from 4:45 a.m. to 6:45 a.m., 5:11 p.m. to 7:11 p.m., and 10:58 a.m. to 12:58 p.m.

We battled the gusty wind from 1:05 p.m. to 3:50 p.m., and it was a chore to eke out 34 largemouth bass and three crappie.

Three largemouth bass were caught on a Z-Man's coppertreuse TRD TicklerZ affixed to a red 1/16-ounce Z-Man's OG Mushroom Jighead. Five largemouth bass were caught on a 2 ½-inch Z-Man's coppertreuse ZinkerZ affixed to a red 1/16-ounce Z-Man's OG Mushroom Jighead. We caught 26 largemouth bass on a 2 ½-inch Z-Man's green-pumpkin ZinkerZ affixed to a red 1/16-ounce Z-Man's OG Mushroom Jighead.

Eleven largemouth bass were caught along two flat and shallow-water shorelines and across a massive shallow-water flat in the back of a primary feeder-creek arm. These two shorelines have a 20- to 25- degree slope. Their underwater terrains consist of gravel, rocks, and silt, which are occasionally embellished with patches of submerged aquatic vegetation. The water's edges are endowed with some patches of winter-dead American water willows that are coated with wads of filamentous algae, seven docks, some laydowns, and several piles of brush. Five of the 11 largemouth bass were caught on the initial drop of our rigs in three to five feet of water. Six largemouth bass were caught on a swim-glide-and-shake presentation in about five feet of water.

Along a shoreline inside a large feeder-creek arm, we caught 10 largemouth bass. Its underwater terrain consists of gravel, rocks, boulders, and silt, which are adorned with a few patches of submerged aquatic vegetation. This shoreline has a 25- to a 45-degree slope. The water's edges are endowed with patches of winter-dead American water willows that are laden with wads of filamentous algae, some cattails, several laydowns, a few stumps, a few shallow-water piles of brush, one dock, and a concrete boat ramp. Three of the 10 largemouth bass were caught on the initial drop of our rigs in about four feet of water. One was caught on a swimming presentation in about seven feet of water. Six were caught on either a drag-and-shake presentation or a drag-shake-and-deadstick presentation in five to eight feet of water.

We caught 13 largemouth bass along the dam. Its underwater terrain consists of gravel, rocks, and boulders. It has about a 55-degree slope. The water's edges are endowed with a few patches of winter-dead American water willows. Four of the 13 largemouth bass were caught on the initial drop of our rigs in about four feet of water. The others were caught while we were executing a drag-and-shake presentation in six to 10 feet of water.

In short, we were hoping to tangle with an average of at least 20 largemouth bass an hour rather than 12 an hour. What's more, there were short portions of three shorelines where we failed to elicit a strike. And the wind confounded our casts and presentations incessantly for 52 of the 165 minutes that we were afloat.

April 19

Steve Reideler of Denton, Texas, posted a log on the Finesse News Network about his April 19 outing.

Here is a slightly edited version of his log.

It was a gorgeous spring day with abundant sunshine and a few thin cirrus clouds adorning the powder-blue sky. The morning low temperature was a chilly 40 degrees, and the afternoon high temperature climbed to a pleasant 77 degrees. The wind quartered out of the south, southwest, and northwest at 5 to 15 mph. The barometric pressure was 30.08 at 9:00 a.m. and 29.95 at 3:00 p.m.

Rick Allen of Dallas and I journeyed back to southern Oklahoma and fished at a Civilian Conservation Corps' hill-land reservoir. This reservoir is the same one that I fished with Bill Kenney of Denton on March 12. During that humbling March 12 jaunt, Bill and I fished for three hours and we failed to cross paths with a single smallmouth bass. We elected to end that outing earlier than we had planned, and we left with only one dinky white bass to show for our efforts.

In-Fisherman's solunar calendar noted that the fishing would be great on April 19, and the most lucrative periods would occur from 4:25 a.m. to 6:25 a.m., 5:18 p.m. to 7:18 p.m., and 11:05 p.m. to 1:05 a.m.

Rick and I fished for six hours from 9:20 a.m. to 3:20 p.m.

The water level appeared to be about a foot high. The water exhibited 10 feet of visibility, which is the clearest we have ever seen it at this impoundment. The surface temperature varied from 61 to 64 degrees.

Rick and I searched for pre-spawn and spawning smallmouth bass inside three bays, at one main-lake point, and around an offshore main-lake hump in the lower, middle, and upper sections of the west tributary arm. In the midsection of the east tributary arm, we dissected a main-lake flat, a main-lake point, and portions of two bays.

Inside the five bays, we targeted rocky secondary points and sections of their adjacent rocky shorelines, small pockets, offshore ledges, and four medium-size rock piles.

Because the water temperature was hovering in the low 60s, we were hoping to catch 30 or so smallmouth bass. Surprisingly, we failed to find any spawning smallmouth bass, spotted bass, or largemouth bass. Instead, we caught 31 smallmouth bass, two spotted bass, and one largemouth bass scattered about inside four of the five bays. They were caught in five to 12 feet of water and were relating to the deep-water sides of the offshore ledges that are covered with three to five feet of water and quickly stair-step into 20 or more feet of water.

The four rock piles yielded two smallmouth bass that were caught in less than five feet of water and they were abiding in close proximity to the rock piles.

One of the two rocky main-lake points surrendered two smallmouth bass that were associated with large submerged boulders in six to nine feet of water. This main-lake point is located at the mouth of one of the bays that is situated in the west tributary arm. The other rocky main-lake point is located at the mouth of one of the bays in the east tributary, and it yielded only one strike, which we failed to hook.

We hooked one unknown species of fish on the main-lake flat located in the midsection of the east tributary arm. It was dwelling in three feet of water, but it was able to pull free before we could see it. This fish was associated with one of several patches of winter-dead cattails that are encircled with three to five feet of water.

The offshore main-lake hump, which is situated in the middle portion of the west tributary arm, failed to surrender a black bass or a strike.

By the time this outing came to an end, we were delighted to catch 38 black bass, which consisted of 35 smallmouth bass, two spotted bass, and one largemouth bass. We also caught one hefty carp by accident.

Our most effective lures were a shortened four-inch Z-Man's green-pumpkin Finesse WormZ rigged on either a chartreuse 1/32-ounce or a chartreuse 1/16-ounce Z-Man's OG Mushroom Jighead, and a Z-Man's green-pumpkin TRD TicklerZ rigged on either a chartreuse 1/32-ounce or a chartreuse 1/16-ounce Z-Man's OG Mushroom Jighead.

The only effective presentation was a slow swim-glide-and-shake retrieve.

In short, the west tributary bays were much more fruitful than the two east tributary bays. And inside the four productive bays, offshore ledges were more fruitful than the rocky secondary points, pockets, and shorelines.

April 21

Steve Reideler of Denton, Texas, posted a log on the Finesse News Network about his April 21 outing.

Here is a slightly edited version of his log.

Norman Brown of Lewisville, Texas, and I fished at one of several U.S. Army Corps of Engineers' hill-land reservoirs in north-central Texas.

A cold front accompanied by robust winds passed through north-central Texas during the evening hours of April 19, and they negatively affected our daytime and nighttime temperatures significantly.

On April 21, the morning hours were sunny with a low temperature of 34 degrees. By mid-afternoon, the sky became overcast and the afternoon high reached 62 degrees. The barometric pressure measured 30.38 at 11:00 a.m. and 30.23 at 5:00 p.m. A meager breeze quartered out of the east-by-northeast at 5 to 8 mph.

According to In-Fisherman's solunar table, the best fishing would occur from 12:23 a.m. to 2:23 a.m., 6:36 a.m. to 8:36 a.m., and 7:02 p.m. to 9:02 p.m.

Norman and I fished for six hours from 11:20 a.m. to 5:20 p.m. The first four hours of this excursion was devoted to locating and catching largemouth and spotted bass, and when the black bass bite petered out in the middle of the afternoon, the final two hours evolved into an unexpected white-bass endeavor.

The water level was at normal pool. The water exhibited between 12 to 24 inches of clarity. The cold front did not appear to have affected the water temperature, and the surface temperature ranged from 64 to 67 degrees.

We stayed in the reservoir's southwest tributary arm. We fished inside four feeder-creek arms, two bays, a 100-yard stretch of a rocky main-lake shoreline, and a riprap-laden bridge embankment. Three of the four feeder-creek arms, one of the two bays, the main-lake shoreline, and the riprap-laden bridge embankment are situated on the north side of the tributary. The other feeder-creek and bay are located on the south side.

The underwater terrains of these areas are identical. They are composed of red clay, some silt, fist-size rocks, pea-gravel, and boulders. Many yards of the shallow-water areas near the water's edge are lined with thick stands of flooded buck brush.

The black-bass fishing was tough while it was sunny, and it was a grind for us to catch two small spotted bass and one channel catfish during the first two hours. But when the sky became overcast later in the afternoon, the fishing began to improve. We caught six more spotted bass, three largemouth bass, five white bass, and five black crappie during the next two hours. And during the last two hours of this outing, we stumbled across a large aggregation of white bass that were foraging on two-inch threadfin shad, and we caught and released 74 of them and another spotted bass.

We caught two spotted bass from the west side of a large bay on the south side of the tributary arm. One was caught inside a small cove on a pea-gravel flat adorned with some partially-flooded buck brush on the north side of the cove. We failed to elicit any strikes along a 75-yard stretch of a riprap shoreline that forms the west shoreline of this cove. The second spotted bass was caught from the side of a submerged roadbed that is situated next to the cove where we caught the first spotted bass. Both of these bass were caught on a steady swimming retrieve with a three-inch Z-Man's pearl Slim SwimZ matched to a blue 3/32-ounce Z-Man's OG Mushroom Jighead in less than three feet of water.

From that bay, we traveled about two miles to the first feeder-creek arm, and it surrendered one channel catfish. It was caught in four feet of water on the west side of the creek arm at a rocky secondary point with a slow swim-glide-and-shake retrieve with a 2 1/2-inch Z-Man's green-pumpkin-red ZinkerZ attached to a red 1/16-ounce OG Mushroom Jighead. We were unable to locate any black bass inside two coves, around six rocky secondary points, and two steep and rocky shorelines.

After that, we moved to a nearby concrete freeway bridge. Near this bridge, we fished inside a small bay north of the bridge, a flat pea-gravel shoreline just south of the bay, and a riprap-laden embankment that gradually transitions into the pea-gravel shoreline.

We caught one largemouth bass in three feet of water from a shallow patch of large rocks in a shaded pocket in the back end of the small bay. It was caught on a swimming retrieve with a blue 3/32-ounce Z-Man's OG Mushroom Jighead sporting a 2 1/2-inch Z-Man's pearl Slim SwimZ. A rocky shoreline and a couple of rocky secondary points on the west side of this bay were fruitless.

In two to four feet of water across a flat pea-gravel shoreline south of the bay, we caught three spotted bass and one largemouth bass. They were induced by a steady swimming retrieve with the 2 1/2-inch pearl Slim SwimZ rigged on either a blue 3/32-ounce OG Mushroom Jighead or an unpainted 3/32-ounce mushroom-style jig.

Along the riprap embankment on the north end of the bridge, we failed to catch a largemouth bass or a spotted bass.

Inside the second feeder-creek arm, we fished around one of the two main-lake entry points and along its adjacent steep and rocky shoreline at the mouth of the creek arm, several rocky secondary points and pockets, the area around a concrete boat ramp, and a small cove on the west side of the creek arm. We did not locate any largemouth bass or spotted bass at the main-lake entry point and its adjacent steep and rocky shoreline, at any of the rocky secondary points and pockets, and the area around the concrete boat ramp. But we caught three largemouth bass, five white bass, and three black crappie in two to four feet of water inside the small cove. They were foraging on two-inch threadfin shad that were dimpling the surface of the water near the outside edges of the thick stands of buckbrush that adorn the shallow-water areas of this cove.

Inside the third feeder-creek arm on the north side of the tributary arm, we were unable to find any threadfin shad or other signs of fish life in the back and middle sections of this creek arm, so we left without making any casts. And as we were slowly motoring out of this creek arm, we saw several white egrets perched in the buckbrush along the shoreline at the mouth of this creek arm, but we did not stop to fish this area at this time.

The fourth feeder-creek arm that we fished is situated on the south side of the tributary arm. We dissected a decorative riprap wall and a small cove on the east side and about halfway back in the creek arm. There were a few small threadfin shad dimpling the surface of the water here and there, but there were no large concentrations of them. We failed to garner any strikes along the decorative riprap wall. We caught two black crappie around some flooded buck brush in the back end of the small cove in two to four feet of water, but we didn't encounter any black bass. These two crappie were caught on a swimming retrieve with our 2 1/2-inch pearl Slim SwimZ rigs.

We then decided to return to the mouth of the third feeder-creek arm where we saw the egrets perched on the branches of the buckbrush along the shoreline at the mouth of the creek arm. This area is a shallow clay-and-gravel flat that is covered with two to six feet of water. Along a 20-yard section of this flat, we enjoyed catching and releasing 74 white bass. They were foraging on small threadfin shad along the outside edges of the stands of buckbrush in less than five feet of water. We also caught one spotted bass from the edge of a large patch of buckbrush that formed a small point on one end of the shoreline, and it was caught many yards away from where we caught the white bass. All of these fish were allured by our 2 1/2-inch pearl Slim SwimZ rigs and a steady swimming retrieve.

All totaled, we caught eight spotted bass, three largemouth bass, 79 white bass, five black crappie, and one channel catfish in six hours.

All of these 96 fish were abiding in less than five feet of water and were mostly associated with the outside edges of thick walls of buckbrush.

The black bass fishing is still a grind for us at the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers' reservoirs in north-central Texas. Fortunately, the white bass fishing is pretty good right now, and they provide a good alternative for us when the black bass fishing is difficult.

April 22

Ned and Pat Kehde of Lawrence, Kansas, posted a log on the Finesse News Network about their April 22 outing at one of northeastern Kansas' state reservoirs.

Here is an unedited version of their log.

According to the nearest National Weather Service office, it was 25 degrees from 3:52 a.m. to 6:52 a.m., and it was 58 degrees at 2:52 p.m. (There was ice on our birdbath at 8:00 a.m.) The wind was calm from 12:52 a.m. to 7:52 a.m., and then it angled out of the south, southwest, and southeast at 3 to 22 mph. The sky was fair from 12:52 a.m. to 12:52 p.m.; then it became cluttered with a few clouds, and it eventually became mostly cloudy. The barometric pressure was 30.24 at 12:52 a.m., 30.21 at 5:52 a.m., 30.22 at 11:52 a.m., and 30.12 at 2:52 p.m.

The water level was a few inches above its normal level. The surface temperature was 55 degrees, which was a three-degree drop since April 19. Our secchi stick revealed that the water exhibited about six feet of visibility. We crossed paths with some burgeoning patches of brittle naiad and coontail.

In-Fisherman's solunar calendar indicated that the best fishing would take place from 7:17 a.m. to 9:17 a.m., 7:24 p.m. to 9:24 p.m., and 1:04 a.m. to 3:04 a.m.

We fished from 11:15 a.m. to 1:30 p.m. We caught 34 largemouth bass, and inadvertently caught three crappie and one redear sunfish.

Eleven of the largemouth bass were caught on a slightly shortened Z-Man's Canada-craw TRD TicklerZ affixed to a red 1/16-ounce Z-Man's OG Mushroom Jighead. A 2 ½-inch Z-Man's green-pumpkin-goby ZinkerZ affixed to a red 1/16-ounce Z-Man's OC Mushroom Jighead caught 23 largemouth bass.

One of the 34 largemouth bass was caught around a main-lake point at the mouth of a tiny feeder-creek arm, and eight were caught inside this tiny feeder-creek arm. The underwater terrain of the point and feeder-creek consist of gravel, rocks, and silt. The shorelines around this point and inside this feeder-creek arm have a 15- to 45-degree slope. There are some burgeoning patches of submerged aquatic vegetation gracing portions of the underwater terrain. The water's edges are adorned with patches of winter-dead American water willows, a few stumps, and a number of laydowns, which are heavily laden with wads of filamentous algae. The largemouth bass were caught many feet from the outside edges of the American water willows in four to six feet of water. Some of them seemed to be abiding around the patches of submerged aquatic vegetation. Four were caught on the initial drop of our rigs. The others were caught on a swim-glide-and-shake presentation. The flatter terrain yielded seven of the nine largemouth bass.

Along about a 200-yard stretch of a flat main-lake shoreline, we caught three largemouth bass. This shoreline has a 20- to 30-degree slope. Its underwater terrain consists of gravel, rocks, and silt. Much of this underwater terrain is becoming embellished with burgeoning patches of submerged aquatic vegetation, and it is also adorned with several manmade brush piles. Portions of the water's edge are lined with patches of winter-dead American water willows. We caught these largemouth bass by applying a swim-glide-and-shake presentation in about four feet of water, and they were caught around the patches of submerged aquatic vegetation and many yards from the water's edge in three to four feet of water

We fished about 120-yards of the shoreline along the dam, which yielded five largemouth bass. It has about a 55-degree slope. Its underwater terrain consists of gravel, rocks, and boulders, and some of this terrain is beginning to be embellished with sprouts of submerged vegetation. The water's edge is endowed with three patches of winter-dead American water willows and a few logs and pieces of brush. These largemouth bass were caught on either a drag-and-shake presentation or a slow swim-glide-and-shake presentation. They were caught in five to about eight feet of water.

Thirteen largemouth bass were caught along about a 250-yard stretch of another flat main-lake shoreline. This shoreline has a 20- to 30-degree slope. Its underwater terrain consists of gravel, rocks, and silt, which is becoming adorned with patches of submerged aquatic vegetation. This area is also cluttered with several manmade brush piles, which are coated with wads of filamentous algae. Portions of the water's edge are lined with patches of winter-dead American water willows. Four largemouth bass were caught on the initial drop of our rigs. The others were caught on three retrieves: a drag-and-shake presentation, a slow swim-glide-and-shake presentation, and a deadstick presentation. They were caught in four to six feet of water and many yards from the water's edge.

We failed to elicit a strike along a steep shoreline in the back of a primary feeder-creek arm.

Along another flat main-lake shoreline, we caught four largemouth bass. This shoreline has a 25- to nearly a 35-degree slope. Its underwater terrain consists of gravel, rocks, and silt. This terrain is becoming endowed with burgeoning patches of submerged aquatic vegetation, and it is also cluttered with several manmade brush piles that are cluttered with wads of filamentous algae. Portions of the water's edge are graced with patches of winter-dead American water willows and some laydowns, which are laden with gobs of filamentous algae. These largemouth bass were caught on a slow swim-glide-and-shake presentation in about five feet of water.

It was not a stellar Midwest finesse outing. What's more, none of these 34 largemouth bass would have pleased a lunker hunter, a tournament angler, or a producer of a television show about largemouth bass fishing. Nevertheless, we were surprised and pleased to catch an hourly average of 15 largemouth bass as we were being walloped with a significant spell of unseasonably cold weather.

April 24

Bob Gum of Kansas City, Kansas, posted a brief on the Finesse News Network about his outing at one of northeastern Kansas' federal reservoirs on April 24.

Here is an edited version of his brief.

The nearest National Weather Service station reported that it was 45 degrees at 6:53 a.m. and 66 degrees at 4:53 p.m. The wind angled out of the north and northwest at 3 to 22 mph. The sky was overcast, foggy, and misty from midnight to 6:53 a.m.; then it became fair. The barometric pressure was 29.86 at 12:53 a.m., 29.90 at 5:53 a.m., 20.99 at 11:53 a.m., and 29.96 at 3:53 p.m.

In-Fisherman's solunar table indicated that the best fishing would take place from 8:47 a.m. to 10:47 a.m., 9:12 p.m. to 11:12 p.m., and 2:34 a.m. to 4:34 a.m.

I fished from 7:00 a.m. to 2:00 p.m. and caught 38 fish: four white bass, four freshwater drum, seven smallmouth bass, and 23 largemouth bass.

The water exhibited from one to two feet of visibility. The surface temperature was 55 degrees at 2:00 p.m. The water level was .10 of a foot above its normal level.

The most fruitful locale was along the riprap shoreline of a massive causeway.

I caught the bulk of the fish on two Midwest finesse rigs: a Z-Man's green-pumpkin TRD TicklerZ affixed to a black 1/16-ounce mushroom-style jig and a Z-Man's Junebug Finesse ShadZ affixed on a red 1/20-ounce mushroom-style jig. I employed a swim-glide-and-shake presentation. And the black bass were caught in two to six feet of water.

I crossed paths with a couple of fishermen who were fishing a black bass tournament, and they were using crankbaits and large spinnerbaits. They mentioned they had one keeper-sized black bass.

April 29

Ned and Pat Kehde of Lawrence, Kansas, posted a log on the Finesse News Network about their April 29 outing at one of northeastern Kansas' state reservoirs.

Here is an edited version of their log.

Mother Nature's one rainy day and many windy days have kept us at bay since April 22.

On April 29, the National Weather Service reported that it was 53 degrees at 6:53 a.m. and 77 degrees at 3:53 p.m. The wind angled out of the west, north, and northwest at 3 to 22 mph. From 12:53 a.m. to 4:53 a.m., the sky fluctuated from being cluttered with a few clouds to being foggy and misty to being overcast to being mostly cloudy, and then it became endlessly fair. The barometric pressure was 29.88 at 12:53 a.m., 29.97 at 5:53 a.m., 30.08 at 11:53 a.m., and 30.o6 at 2:53 p.m.

The water level looked to be slightly more than 12 inches above its normal level. The surface temperature was 62 degrees. The water exhibited about six feet of visibility. We were delighted to find numerous patches of burgeoning brittle naiad and curly-leaf pondweed.

In-Fisherman's solunar table indicated that the best fishing would take place from 12:52 a.m. to 2:52 a.m., 1:22 p.m. to 3:22 p.m., and 7:07 a.m. to 9:07 a.m.

We fished from 10:31 a.m. to 1:31 p.m. We caught 49 largemouth bass, 14 crappie, and one white bass.

These fish were caught on two standard Midwest finesse rigs: a Z-Man's PB&J Finesse TRD affixed to a red 1/16-ounce Z-Man's OG Mushroom Jighead and a 2 ½-inch Z-Man's green-pumpkin-goby ZinkerZ affixed to a red 1/16-ounce Z-Man's OG Mushroom Jighead.

We spent about 45 minutes fishing around the spillway and along the riprap shoreline of the dam, and we struggled to catch one largemouth bass. The dam has a 45-degree slope. The spillway has a 25-degree slope. Their underwater terrains consist of gravel, rocks, and boulders, which are occasionally laced with some minor patches of brittle naiad. The water's edges are endowed with some patches of winter-dead American water willows. The largemouth bass was caught in about five feet of water on a slow swim-glide-shake presentation with our ZinkerZ rig.

Along about a 700-yard stretch of a main-lake shoreline, we caught 38 largemouth bass. This shoreline's underwater terrain consists of gravel, rocks, and a few boulders. The gravel and rocks are occasionally enhanced with patches of brittle naiad and curly-leaf pondweed. The slope of this shoreline ranges from 25 to 80 degrees. Most of its water's edge is endowed with winter-dead stems of American water willows. It is also enhanced with some laydowns, a few stumps, several manmade brush piles, some overhanging trees, and seven riprap jetties. Our Finesse TRD rig and ZinkerZ rig caught these 38 bass with a variety of Midwest finesse presentations: the swim, glide, and shake; the drag and shake; the deadstick; the straight swim; and the initial drop. We elicited about 13 strikes that we failed to hook. There was no primary location pattern: some largemouth bass were caught along the flatter portions of this shoreline; a few were caught along the steeper areas; some were caught near the outside edges of the patches of winter-dead American water willows; some were caught around the patches of brittle naiad and curly-leaf pondweed; some were caught around the riprap jetties.

We caught 10 largemouth bass around a main-lake point and along one of its adjacent shorelines. These locales have a 20- to 40-degree slope. The underwater terrains of the point and shoreline consist of clay, gravel, rocks, and some boulders. Patches of brittle naiad and curly-leaf pondweed adorn the flatter portions of the underwater terrain. The water's edges are endowed with occasional patches of winter-dead American water willows, a few laydowns, an occasional stump, and one riprap jetty. We fished along two separate sections of the shoreline, and these sections were about 50 yards long. Four of the 10 largemouth bass were caught around the main-lake point in about five feet of water. Along the shoreline, we caught three largemouth bass around patches of brittle naiad in about four feet of water, two largemouth bass were caught around the riprap jetty in about five feet of water, and one was caught near a laydown in about four feet of water. Four of the 10 largemouth bass were caught on the initial drop of our rigs. Two were caught on a deadstick presentation. Four were caught on a slow swim-glide-and-shake presentation.

April 30

Ned Kehde of Lawrence, Kansas, and Rick Hebenstreit of Shawnee, Kansas, posted a log on the Finesse News Network about their April 30 outing at one of northeastern Kansas' community reservoirs.

Here is an edited version of their log.

The National Weather Service reported that it was 50 degrees at 3:53 a.m. and 79 degrees at 1:53 p.m. The wind angled out of the north, northwest, west, and southwest at 3 to 18 mph. The sky was cluttered with a few clouds at 6:53 a.m. and 2:53 p.m. It was partly cloudy at 5:53 a.m., and it was fair during the rest of the day. The barometric pressure was 30.18 at 12:53 a.m., 30.18 at 5:53 a.m., 30.22 at 11:53 a.m., and 30.16 at 2:53 p.m.

The water level looked to be a few inches above its normal level. The surface temperature ranged from 62 to 65 degrees. For months on end, this reservoir has been adversely affected by a significant red euglena eruption, and since this eruption, the black bass fishing has been extremely trying. Our secchi stick revealed that there was 2 ½ to 3 ½ feet of clarity. Despite the euglena bloom, which can damage the submerged aquatic vegetation, we found and fished around a number of patches of brittle naiad, coontail, and curly-leaf pondweed.

In-Fisherman's solunar table indicated that the best fishing would take place from 1:56 a.m. to 3:56 a.m., 2:27 p.m. to 4:27 p.m., and 8:12 a.m. to 10:12 a.m.

We fished from 10:00 a.m. to 2:00 p.m. We caught 20 largemouth bass, one smallmouth bass, one rainbow trout, one walleye, and one white bass.

Except for the eight largemouth bass and the one smallmouth bass that we caught along the shoreline of the dam, it is difficult to describe how we located and caught the other 12 largemouth bass. As we assessed this outing, we concluded we either accidentally crossed paths with those 12 largemouth bass and somehow caught them or they crossed paths with us and caught us. In other words, there was no rhyme or reason for how, when, and where we caught them. Thus, it is difficult to compose a log about what transpired.

The dam has about a 50-degree slope. Its underwater terrain consists of gravel, rocks, and boulders, and some spots are adorned with brittle naiad, coontail, a few piles of brush, and some laydowns.

Around several laydowns in about five feet of water, we caught one largemouth bass on a 2 ½-inch Z-Man's Junebug ZinkerZ affixed to a chartreuse 1/16-ounce Z-Man's OG Mushroom Jighead with a swim-glide-and-shake presentation. The smallmouth bass and seven largemouth bass were caught on a Z-Man's Junebug Finesse ShadZ affixed to a chartreuse 1/16-ounce Z-Man's OG Mushroom Jighead. Five of them were caught on the initial drop of our Finesse ShadZ rigs in two to three feet of water and three to four feet from the water's edge. The others were caught on a slow swim-glide-and-shake presentation in four to five feet of water. Two of the eight largemouth bass were caught on back-to-back casts.

Somehow, we caught three largemouth bass along a steep main-lake shoreline adjacent to the dam. This shoreline has a 45- to 90-degree slope. Its underwater terrain consists of gravel, rocks, and boulders. The water's edge is embellished with laydowns, overhanging trees, and a few patches of winter-dead American water willows. One largemouth bass was caught on the initial drop of the Finesse ShadZ rig in about four feet of water around a pile of rocks and boulders. Two were caught on the initial drop of the ZinkerZ rig; one of these two was caught around a laydown and partially under an overhanging tree in about four feet of water; the second one was caught around the outside edge of a patch of water-dead American water willows in about three feet of water.

Inside a small feeder-creek arm near the dam, we caught three largemouth bass. The underwater terrain of this feeder creek consists of clay, gravel, rocks, and some boulders, which are adorned with some meager patches of submerged aquatic vegetation. The shoreline has a 20- to 45-degree slope. Its water edge is graced with some laydowns and patches of winter-dead American water willows. Adjacent to the shoreline, there is a shallow-water flat that is about the size of three tennis courts, and this is endowed with several massive boulders and some meager patches of submerged aquatic vegetation. Along the shoreline, one largemouth bass was caught on the initial drop of the Finesse ShadZ rig around a small laydown in about four feet of water. On the shallow-water flat, two largemouth bass were caught on the initial drop of the ZinkerZ rig in about five feet of water, and they were caught on back-to-back casts.

One largemouth bass was caught along a 100-yard stretch of a main-lake shoreline near the dam. This shoreline has a 40- to 50-degree slope. Its underwater terrain consists of gravel, rocks, and boulders, which are laced with a few patches of submerged aquatic vegetation. The water's edge is lined with many patches of winter-dead American water willows. The largemouth bass was caught along the outside edge of a patch of winter-dead American water willows, and it was caught on the initial drop of a Z-Man's pearl TRD TicklerZ affixed to a chartreuse 1/16-ounce Z-Man's OG Mushroom Jighead in about three feet of water.

Inside a small feeder-arm adjacent to this main-lake shoreline, we caught one largemouth bass. This shoreline has a 30-degree slope. Its underwater terrain consists of gravel, rocks, and boulders, which are endowed with a few patches of submerged aquatic vegetation. The water's edge is lined with patches of winter-dead American water willows and some small piles of brush. This largemouth bass was caught on the Finesse ShadZ rig with a swim-glide-and-shake presentation in about five feet of water along the outside edge of a patch of winter-dead American water willows.

We caught four largemouth bass inside a medium-size feeder-creek arm in the upper half of this reservoir. One was caught along a 175-yard stretch of a shoreline that is lined with scores of laydowns, overhanging trees, and a few patches of winter-dead American water willows. The underwater terrain consists of gravel, clay, and rocks, which are covered with a few patches of coontail. This largemouth bass was caught on the Finesse ShadZ rig with a very slow swim-glide-and-shake presentation in about five feet of water. Three largemouth bass were caught across a massive shallow-water flat in the back half of this feeder-creek arm. Patches of coontail embellish a significant portion of this flat. Two of the three largemouth bass were caught on a three-inch Z-Man's green-pumpkin Slim SwimZ affixed to a red 3/32-ounce Z-Man's OG Mushoom Jighead with a slow swimming presentation in about six feet of water. The third largemouth bass was caught on the initial drop of the Finesse ShadZ rig in about six feet of water.

There were four main-lake points, many secondary points, several tertiary points, many square yards of shallow-water flats, scores of yards of various shorelines, and untold numbers of casts and retrieves that failed to yield a strike.

In short, it was a very disappointing outing. What's more, it was more than a tad unsightly. Besides the red euglena eruption, this reservoir's population of zebra mussels has radically diminished, and that demise and the euglena eruption have affected the water clarity. What's more, a significant portion of this reservoir's watershed has become adversely affected by a massive construction site, which has allowed vast quantities of silt to flow into the reservoir. This community reservoir used to be one of our most bountiful ones, and we are beginning to fear that those days will be long gone.

It is interesting to note that Midwest finesse anglers and power anglers in northeastern Kansas have noticed that their abilities to catch largemouth bass and smallmouth bass have declined at the same time that the populations of the zebra mussels have declined in our community, federal, and state reservoirs.

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